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Lard have Mercy

Obesity by Age, 2011-14

When it comes to measuring obesity, the federal government doesn't fool around with self-reported heights and weights. That's because, given the chance, many people overestimate their height and underestimate their weight. Rather than ask people for their measurements, the federal government takes them—measuring the height and weight of a representative sample of Americans across the country. After collecting the numbers, Body Mass Index is calculated (weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared). In adults, obesity is defined as a BMI equal to or greater than 30. In children, obesity is defined as a BMI equal to or greater than the age- and sex-specific 95th percentile of the CDC's growth charts.

According to measurements taken in 2011-14, a substantial 36.3 percent of adults (aged 20 or older) were obese, up from 30.5 percent in 1999-2000. Among youth (under age 20), 17.0 percent were obese, up from 13.9% in 1999-2000. Here are the results by age...

Percent obese, 2011-14
Aged 2 to 5:       8.9%
Aged 6 to 11:    17.5%
Aged 12 to 19:  20.5%
Aged 20 to 39:  32.3%
Aged 40 to 59:  40.2%
Aged 60-plus:   37.0%

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, Prevalence of Obesity among Adults and Youth: United States, 2011-2014

 


 

Seneca Army Depot for Sale: What of the White Deer?

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Editor's Notes: When we see the words "developable acres" we cringe. A housing development on this site would destroy a prime stretch of Seneca Lake real estate and raises questions about re-use, wildlife protection and general environmental issues. Remember: Nuclear materials were stored here. The following is taken from a direct email to The Admin, from news@meltwaterpress.com via dynect.net

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

FOR SALE: Former Seneca Army Depot

Approximately 7,000 developable acres in the heart of Upstate New York's Finger Lakes is for sale

WATERLOO, N.Y., Dec. 10, 2015 - The Seneca County Industrial Development Agency (IDA) today approved the formal Invitation for Bids for prospective buyers of the approximately 7,000-acre former Seneca Army Depot, a former World War II ordnance depot located between Seneca Lake and Cayuga Lake in the heart of the Finger Lakes region of Upstate New York.

The Depot – which is believed to be one of the largest developable sites in the Northeastern United States - includes approximately 3,000 acres located in the town of Varick and approximately 4,000 acres are in Romulus, both within Seneca County.

The property includes numerous buildings, roads, and a section of railroad track. Among the buildings are 459 igloos that once served as storage facilities for armaments during World War II and throughout the Cold War era. Potential future uses of the Depot property include but are in no way limited to agribusiness, manufacturing, warehouse and distribution, data storage, conservation, and many others.

More details about the site, including additional infrastructure and utility information, can be found online at www.senecaarmydepotreuse.com.

“We recognize that the former Seneca Army Depot has the potential to be a true asset to the community,“ said IDA Executive Director Bob Aronson. “By selling it, the County will benefit from an increased tax base and the resulting economic activity.”

An informational meeting and driving tour of the Depot for prospective buyers only will take place at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 15, at the Romulus Fire Hall, 2010 Cayuga St., in the town of Romulus, Seneca County. Buyers who are interested in attending the meeting must RSVP in advance by phone or email at (315) 539-1725 or k.kline@senecacountyida.org.

As part of the Dec. 15 meeting, IDA officials will provide more details to buyers regarding the formal Invitation for Bids.

“The IDA wants to see this land repurposed in a way that will bring value to the County,” Aronson said. “We will consider every proposal with the hope that the selected buyer or buyers will revitalize this unique piece of property.”

The tentative deadline for submission of bids is Monday, Feb. 29, 2016. Additional information about the bid process can be found online at www.senecacountyida.org. Depot property details can be found online at www.senecaarmydepotreuse.com.

To request a copy of the Invitation for Bids, please contact Kelly Kline at (315) 539-1725 or k.kline@senecacountyida.org.

For additional information contact

Megan Connor Murphy

Martino Flynn

585-641-4530 direct

mmurphy@martinoflynn.com

 

 

Demo Memo: And this little Piggy Bank went Belly-Up

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Most U.S. Families Can't Take a Financial Hit

DIDN'T MAKE THE CUT: Unemployed father, Boston, Mass. Frankie14850

How much money could the typical household access within 30 days to cover the cost of a financial shock? According to the Survey of American Family Finances, the median household could get its hands on just $3,000 within 30 days. That's not much of a buffer, and it includes credit cards and help from friends and family.

In the second of three reports on the finances of American households, Pew Charitable Trusts examines the financial assets available to families when they experience a financial shock. That's when, not if. Financial shocks are the norm. Fully 60 percent of households experienced a financial shock in the past year, according to the findings of Pew's first report.



One of the most important resources for weathering a financial shock is liquid savings, which Pew defines as money in a checking or savings account, cash saved at home, and the value of unused prepaid cards. The typical household has only $3,800 in liquid savings, and a substantial one in four has less than $400.

Source: The Pew Charitable Trusts, What Resources Do Families Have for Financial Emergencies?

From Demo Memo by Cheryl Russell  http://demomemo.blogspot.com/

Russell is a demographer and the editorial director of New Strategist Publications. She is the former editor-in-chief of American Demographics magazine (then located in Ithaca) and The Boomer Report. She is the author of Bet You Didn't Know and other books on demographic trends. She holds a master's degree in sociology/demography from Cornell University.

Last Updated on Friday, 04 December 2015 06:10
 

From Cornell Magazine: A Very Different Look at the Legacy of Carl Sagan

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EDITOR'S NOTE: This is a screen shot of a piece published in the Cornell Alumni Magazine (CAM), an editorially autonomous publication for the university's alums. We reprint it here not to steal anyone's thunder nor plunder a copyright, but to spread the good news about this endearing tale. November marked the 20th anniversary of the much beloved Cornell astronomer Carl Sagan and Franklin Crawford, Administrator for tinytowntimes, wrote the piece.  We thank the staff at CAM for their good editorial work and fine presentation of this memorable news item.

 

Last Updated on Thursday, 03 December 2015 06:56
 

Another One Bites the Dust: Tompkins Weekly Newspaper shuts down operations immediately

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TEN YEARS AFTER: A BREAKOUT WEEKLY SHUTS DOWN

Nov. 30th Edition Marked Its Final Publication

Tiny Town, USA – Tompkins Weekly, a small but respected local publication, announced it was shutting down operations after 10 years in business. Its Nov. 30, 2015 paper was its last edition.

The paper, formerly owned by Jim Graney, also publisher of Ithaca Child and Ithaca Teens, was recently sold-to and run-by Graney's associate, Dan Bruffey. The paper recently laid off its copy editor and the only full-time staffer remaining was Jay Wrolstad, a workhorse editor who has knocked-about the publishing world for most of his adult life. Wrolstad was a former editor for the Ithaca Times.

 

Circulation peaked at about 20,000 copies, with 8,000 copies printed each week at the end. Graney said falling ad revenue and a trend toward less lucrative trade ad sales were cited as too costly to manage. Graney, also a former Ithaca Times employer, served as the paper's ad man for a good chunk of its short life. He also cited the need to spend more time with his family as a major driver behind his departure.

"It's one thing to have a paper but you've got to have that revenue stream and if you don't, then you're not going to make it," said Graney, who will continue to publish Ithaca Child and Ithaca Teens.

TW kept a stable of a half a dozen local freelance writers busy and was often notable for it broader and deeper coverage of issues than found in area dailies.

In the course of the last year, salaries were scaled back and the paper began to take on the weary look of an ad rag. Still, some bylines enlivened the product, including those of this reporter.

Wrolstad said he'll be pounding the pavements at a dismal time of year to search for work. We wish all members of this respectable organization the very best in finding work in a market seeking bright chipper go-getters who are "juiced" about journalism. Save your juice for breakfast. Journalism's a tough racket.

Franklin "Two Timing" Crawford, tinytowntimes Admin and freelancer abroad.

 


Last Updated on Saturday, 05 December 2015 06:55
 


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