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Who Shot Liberty Hyde Bailey?

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Tiny Town, USA – EDuCorp is seething with mysteries.

We are about to silence one of them.

Who shot Liberty Hyde Bailey? There he is (left), among the specimens the great botanist, among others greats who proceeded him, collected in situ from other planets, like Brazil.

He is seated not in the current L.H. Bailey Conservatory Hortatorium, a.k.a., Purple Conservatory 1023A, on EDuCorp's Tower Road.

Nope. 

The man is sitting in what once was a lavish miniature Kew Gardens Conservatory that stood outside Sage Hall. The original Conservatory of the Botanical Department of Cornell University was a grand structure with five bays, 50 x 152 feet all together. And young Prof. Bailey was fond of it. 

He also was fond of himself. And the picture here, more than a century old, was taken by Prof. Bailey and printed on cyanotype, a photography fad at the time. 

So the question is answered: Who shot Liberty Hyde Bailey? Why, folks, the man shot himself. 

– C. Penbroke Handy 

 

Jerry Droleski plays In the Court of the Crimson King -- on Accordion

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Jerry Droleski can knock about any 60s-70s acid rock tune out of the park. There is a wonderful moment when some jackass comes up and says "play some Dylan." Jerry is in the middle of performing King Crimson's awesome tune "In the Court of the Crimson King." 

To the intruder's request Droleski just skip a beat. Dylan? 

"Why?" 

Indeed. Why?

Jerry is available for lessons. Check him out if you any interest in learning accordion: ARGON2040@yahoo.com 

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City of Asylum features rare and rich mix of local writers

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Tiny Town, USA – If you haven't heard authors James McConkey or Alison Lurie read from their works in public, the Ithaca City of Asylum (ICOA) project is offering you a rare and perhaps one-time-only chance to hear them in tandem.

 

 The project is celebrating its 10th year with "Voices of Freedom," a reading that features local writers, including current and emeritus members of the Cornell faculty James M. McConkey, Alison Lurie, Helena Maria Viramontes, and Ernesto Quiñonez.  

The reading will be held Sat., Nov. 6, from 1 p.m to 4 pm at the Kitchen Theatre Company, 417 W. State St., in downtown Ithaca.  It is  free and open to the public.

Ithaca City of Asylum, which began in early 2001, is one of only four cities in the United States providing asylum for struggling and refugee writers. In its 10-year history, ICOA has provided a safe place to live and work for four international writers and their families. In the face of political repression, these writers have spoken up for freedom of expression in their own countries and continue to do so within Ithaca’s supportive and creative community.

ICOA’s guests have included Yi Ping, a poet from China; Reza Daneshvar, a playwright and novelist from Iran; Sarah Mkhonza, a fiction writer and linguist from Swaziland; and, most recently, Irakli Kakabadze, a poet, playwright, and journalist from the Republic of Georgia.

All have done significant creative work while living in Ithaca, and have published with the assistance of ICOA, taught at local schools, and contributed to the community’s cultural through various literary, scholarly, and political events.

Reflecting their appreciation of the life they’ve been able to build here, three of four hosted writers still happily reside and work in Ithaca.

For more information visit ithacacityofasylum.wordpress.com/

Pictured: Author James McConkey in his home parlor. Credit: Frankie14850

Last Updated on Tuesday, 02 November 2010 18:50
 

Getting closer to an honest tribute to David Mordavanek

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i can't get the death of david mordavanec out of my mind. i stay up late and play with photos and get wired on coffee until the birds are chirping. A paean should be joyous and this pretentious improv tries to get there, but i am anything but joyful about the situation. which will pass. right? it will pass all this drama ...

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 12 October 2010 05:31
 

Leo the Lion Hearted From There to Here to the big Rat Hole in the Sky: Eternity

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Tiny Town, USA – Rat hole. Doesn't sound like heaven. 

Ha!

You didn't know Leo. He was a Jack. Nothing better than a hole with a rat or a chuckerwoodie at the end of it. And usually, that was the end of it.

Let's see: Never met Leo. Didn't have to. You know him right away and all the time. He's the dog who rules the life of his owner for 18 years, finishes off her morning coffee every day or the day doesn't get started right.

Yes! Leo liked to splash his tongue around the bottom of a coffee cup. Dark or light, preferably light. Sugar? Cubes we think would be best. 

Whaddya know. He got old and signaled it was time to dig deep and stay deep for a while. It was okay; Leo understood the deal. So did his best buddy, Liza. 

And so, we ask you, stranger and friend alike: When you get the bottom of your next hot cuppa what ails you, take your time, make it ring in your mind like a toy piano. Raise it up and look at the reflections bend or note how the light hits the fibers or feel the feel of the Styrofoam (still such a new bit of business in the stream of things eternal).

Then -- DO THE LEO!  Yes by golly by gum. Slurp the rest of that damn thing. Slurp it for Leo the Lion-Hearted, slurp it like your very life depended on it. Make a BIG noise. Let a stranger take part with an irritated, amused, confused, petulant, imperious, holier than thou, never was raised that way, lookie look.

Then say, whether they care to hear it not: "That was for Leo. And it meant Everything that ever Was and IS and WILL BE!" 

Because in Leo's world it did -- and goddammit, it sure does. Leo knew exactly how to get to the bottom of things.

Especially hearts.

Especially one heart in particular.

Happy hunting, Leo.

– C. Penbroke Handy 

 

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 05 October 2010 00:53
 


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