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Demo Memo: Skip journalism school go directly to Interweb

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J-School a dead end; DIY on the Web

Until the introduction of the smartphone in 2007, the effect of the internet on employment in traditional media—newspapers, magazines, and books—had been minimal. Between 1993 (when Mosaic was introduced—the first graphical interface for the Worldwide Web) and 2007, newspaper employment had fallen some, but the worst was yet to come. Employment in the magazine and book industries was almost unchanged during those years. Not so after the smartphone transformed the internet into something personal and portable...

Employment change in newspaper industry
1993 to 2007: –79,000
2007 to 2016: –168,200
68% of job loss occurred since 2007

Employment change in magazine industry
1993 to 2007: –300
2007 to 2016: –48,400
99% of job loss occurred since 2007

Employment change in book industry
1993 to 2007: 700
2007 to 2016: –20,700
100% of job loss occurred since 2007

Traditional media jobs are disappearing, and new jobs are emerging in internet publishing and broadcasting—but not enough to fill the gap. Internet media employment grew by 125,300 between 2007 and 2016, or a little less than half the 237,300 jobs lost in the newspaper, magazine, and book industries. Even including job growth in television and film, there has been a net loss of 159,200 media jobs since 2007.

Source: Demo Memo analysis of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Employment Trends in Newspaper Publishing and Other Media, 1990-2016

Last Updated on Saturday, 11 June 2016 12:51
 

Internet is killing the casual reader right in the eyes

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Decline in Spending on Reading Material

Percent of households spending on books, newspapers, and magazines (including e-editions), and other reading material during the average quarter of...

2014: 26%
2010: 37%
2005: 46%
2002: 54%

Source: Demo Memo analysis of the Consumer Expenditure Survey

Cheryl Russell is a nationally renowned demographer as well as editorial director of New Strategist Press. Russell also is the former editor-in-chief of American Demographics magazine and The Boomer Report. She has written numerous books about demographic trends. Ms. Russell is a professional demographer with a master's degree from Cornell University.


 

Last Updated on Sunday, 01 May 2016 01:58
 

Demo Memo: What's eating Americans and vice versa

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Who Eats What and How Much in America

Yogurt, broccoli, orange juice, peanuts: the USDA knows how much you eat (although they don't mention take-out sushi). Through diary surveys in which respondents record their daily food intake combined with commodity data measuring aggregate consumption, government researchers are able to track what we eat and how it's changing. A USDA report looks at some of the changes in per capita consumption from 1994–98 through 2007–08 (the latest data available)...

  • We are eating less fruit, but mostly because we're drinking less orange juice.
  • We are eating fewer vegetables, but mostly because we've cut back on potatoes.
  • We are drinking less milk, but we're eating more cheese and yogurt.


The report also examines who eats what by demographic characteristic. Take yogurt, for example. The average person ate 8.07 pounds of yogurt in 2007–08, nearly twice the 4.05 pounds in 1994–98. The biggest fans of yogurt are women (10.93 pounds per year), those with higher incomes (9.26 pounds), and college graduates (10.92 pounds).

Much more about trends in food consumption and the demographics of who eats what are available in the USDA Economic Research Service report U.S. Food Commodity Consumption Broken Down by Demographics, 1994-2008

From Demo Memo by Cheryl Russell  http://demomemo.blogspot.com/

Russell is a demographer and the editorial director of New Strategist Publications. She is the former editor-in-chief of American Demographics magazine (then located in Ithaca) and The Boomer Report. She is the author of Bet You Didn't Know and other books on demographic trends. She holds a master's degree in sociology/demography from Cornell University.


Last Updated on Monday, 25 April 2016 20:40
 

Remembering Steven Stucky: An Interview from 2005, the year of his Pulitzer award

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Editor's Note: This piece was written on April 21, 2005, the year Steven Stucky won the Pulitzer Prize for his Second Concerto. We have chosen to leave it as a snapshot in time; a lot happened to this marvelous composer since that time. The piece originally appeared in The Cornell Chronicle and I remember well sitting with Steve in his DeWitt Mall studio and his studio at Cornell discussing the piece and the wiles of modern composing. For a recent tribute in the wake of his recent death, please see . He was a warm and humble man whose connection to the LA Philharmonic became a legend among those close to the scene. He will be greatly missed.

Steal this concerto, please: An interview with Steven Stucky

Steve Stucky, Cornell composer, professor, and winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for music composition, out on a morning stroll with a borrowed muse, Sophie. 
August 23, 2008, downtown Ithaca, New York. Credit: Frankie14850.

 

Last Updated on Monday, 25 April 2016 05:08
 

Demo Memo: First comes love (some times), then marriage, then the baby carriage

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Attitudes Toward Marriage and Childbearing

Cohabitation and out-of-wedlock childbearing, already commonplace in the United States, may become the norm in the years ahead if the attitudes of the nation's younger adults are any indicator. According to the 2011-13 National Survey of Family Growth, most adults under age 45 think cohabitation and out-of-wedlock childbearing are okay. Respondents were asked whether they agreed or disagreed with the following statements...

A young couple should not live together unless they are married
Men who disagreed: 75%
Women who disagreed: 71%

It's okay to have and raise children when the parents are living together but not married
Men who agreed: 76%
Women who agreed: 75%

It's okay for an unmarried female to have and raise a child
Men who agreed: 69%
Women who agreed: 78%

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Survey of Family Growth, Trends in Attitudes about Marriage, Childbearing, and Sexual Behavior: United States, 2002, 2006-2010, and 2011-2013


 

 

Demo Memo was created by Cheryl Russell, nationally renowned demographer as well as editorial director of New Strategist Press. Russell also is the former editor-in-chief of American Demographics magazine and The Boomer Report. She has written numerous books about demographic trends. Ms. Russell is a professional demographer with a master's degree from Cornell University.
Last Updated on Monday, 28 March 2016 11:22
 
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